Chickpea to Cook by Rumi

c3c77f21adfcc1a4035b33cafd72368e

Photo source: Josefine Stenudd on Flickr 

CHICKPEA TO COOK

A chickpea leaps almost over the rim of the pot

where it’s being boiled.

‘Why are you doing this to me?’

The cook knocks him down with the ladle.

‘Don’t you try to jump out.

You think I’m torturing you.

I’m giving you flavour,

so you can mix with spices and rice

and be the lovely vitality of a human being.

Remember when you drank rain in the garden.

That was for this.’

Grace first. Sexual pleasure,

then a boiling new life begins,

and the Friend has something good to eat.

Eventually the chickpea

will say to the cook,

‘Boil me some more.

Hit me with the skimming spoon.

I can’t do this by myself.

I’m like an elephant that dreams of gardens

back in Hindustan and doesn’t pay attention

to his driver.  You’re my cook, my driver,

my way to existence.  I love your cooking.’

The cook says,

‘I was once like you,

fresh from the ground.  Then I boiled in time,

and boiled in the body, two fierce boilings.

My animal soul grew powerful.

I controlled it with practices,

and boiled some more, and boiled

once beyond that,

  and became your teacher.’

220px-molana

Source: Wikipedia

Mawlānā Jalāl ad-Dīn Muḥammad Balkhī
مولانا جلال‌الدین محمد بلخی

Rūmī 

Medieval Persian sage Rumi was trained in Sufism – a mystic tradition within Islam.  Rumi founded the Sufi order known to us as the Whirling Dervishes, who use dance and music as part of their spiritual devotion.  Rumi’s poetry combines lyrical beauty with spiritual profundity, rapture with an awareness of human suffering.

Medieval Persian sage Rumi was trained in Sufism – a mystic tradition within Islam.  Rumi founded the Sufi order known to us as the Whirling Dervishes, who use dance and music as part of their spiritual devotion.  Rumi’s poetry combines lyrical beauty with spiritual profundity, rapture with an awareness of human suffering.

(from Wikipedia):

Rumi’s influence transcends national borders and ethnic divisions:Iranians, Tajiks, Turks, Greeks, Pashtuns, other Central Asian Muslims, and the Muslims of South Asia have greatly appreciated his spiritual legacy for the past seven centuries.[10] His poems have been widely translated into many of the world’s languages and transposed into various formats. Rumi has been described as the “most popular poet”[11] and the “best selling poet” in the United States.[12][13]

220px-jalal_al-din_rumi2c_showing_his_love_for_his_young_disciple_hussam_al-din_chelebi

Jalal ad-Din Rumi gathers Sufimystics. (Source: Wikipedia)

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s